Are you a good teacher?

I am confident in the Lord that you will take no other view. The one who is throwing you into confusion, whoever that may be, will have to pay the penalty. Galatians 5:10

I like good teachers. Those that believe in their students, even when he or she is at their worse. Do they make teachers like that anymore? Even though teachers these days seem to lack patience and empathy for their students, especially when they neither understand nor can relate to their student’s culture, this was not the kind of teacher Paul was. Paul was a shepherd of a teacher. Not only did He taught well, but he gave encouragement to people that seemed like they didn’t deserve it. Have you had a teacher or mentor like that?

are you a good teacher

Teachers were once students, and it’s like they get to have a foresight over their students’ future. That is, they can call forth gifts and talents out of their students, that the students can’t really see for themselves. But, if that student trusts the teacher, he or she will believe in the words spoken, and strive to become what the teacher called into fruition. We are assuming here that the teacher is speaking nothing but positives to their students. But, do you know that if that teacher prophesies negatively over that student it will also have the same effect?

READ MORE: Take control of your thoughts

You will probably agree, teachers have influence over every student they come in contact with. Paul is the head teacher and he is not pleased. He asks, who was it that was throwing the Galatians into confusion? Paul says, they “will have to pay the penalty.”

I’ve had some great teachers in the secondary school systems, both in Jamaica and Canada. And I have also had profound professors at the University level, both undergraduate and graduate. I have been blessed with teachers who filled me with encouragement, had patience with me, and empowered me by their words to be extraordinary. In fact, up until my experience at Seneca College in Toronto, I have never had a negative experience with a teacher. I was 30 years old when I attended Seneca College. It was my first and only time I had a teacher that looked down on me. I could tell she thought I was never good enough in the four months I was with her. She gave me a failing grade in the end. This kind of teacher can thwart God’s plan for a student’s life. Even though I felt crappy and demotivated, my thoughts were above confident. I was already a University graduate and a professional woman. The fact is, I already knew I was a great student, regardless of how she felt about me and the grade she assigned me. If the Apostle Paul were in Canada, he would have stepped in the class to give me a pep talk: I am confident in the Lord that you will take no over view. In other words, regardless of the teachers ill words, grade or attitude towards you, you are still the star God made you to be. That one teacher do not have authority to change your life or destiny.

READ MORE: Running the good race until it’s over

Paul says those teachers who create confusion will pay the penalty. Teachers come from all walks of life, they are in the church, in the workplaces, at conferences, at home, and of course at school. We ourselves might even be a teacher. We have a responsibility to be great teachers, as well as to pray for those not-so-great teachers. While God hasn’t overlooked what they have done to you, we do have a responsibility towards them as well. Jesus said, “Father, forgive them, for they do not know what they are doing.” (Luke 12:34). Let us be transformed by the word of God. As teachers, we have a great responsibility. And that is, we ought to teach well. None of us should be in the business of causing other people to fall into confusion. As Christians it is our job to uplift and lead everyone to Christ.

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